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Maintaining the health of pets is the responsibility of the owner, not the veterinarian

Humans are the caretakers of our pets. It is our responsibility, our duty, not to go blindly to the vet for another rabies vaccine without questioning whether it is in the best interest of the animal or the doctor’s livelihood. Here are some facts you may not know about and how you can play an active role in your pet’s well-being.

-Many of our pets are acquiring autoimmune diseases, behavioral problems such as phobias and aggressive behavior, and some are dying, all due to vaccination, being over-vaccinated by the same veterinarians that we have to keep them alive and disease-free. Often these diseases do not appear for years and we wonder how and why.
-Tumors can become a problem in the areas where most injections are given. Be save. Feel around those areas frequently or when grooming, to make sure no lumps form. If there are, have them examined.
– Veterinarians will argue that their state laws require annual repeat rabies shots and other six-month vaccinations. Rabies laws differ between states, but any licensed veterinarian will tell you that annual rabies shots are not necessary and can be deadly. Every pet owner has the right to request an exemption from these vaccines. Some states will allow it, others will not.

Advances in Medicine / Challenging Annual Rabies Vaccines
Veterinarians rely heavily on the income they receive from repeated visits to animals for vaccinations; many still give multiple vaccinations to every dog ​​and cat that walks through the door. Thanks to organizations like the American Association of Feline Practitioners, the American Association for Animal Hospitals (AAHA), and extensive research by the likes of Dr. Ronald Schultz of the University of Wisconsin, a different rabies vaccination policy is emerging. within the veterinary community to modify treatment by giving as few vaccinations as possible to keep Garfield and Fido healthy.

Here is some encouraging news about the vaccine protocol change from Dr. Ronald Schultz, director of pathobiology at the University of Wisconsin:

– “I would like to let you know that the 27 veterinary schools in North America are in the process of changing their protocols for vaccinating dogs and cats. Some of this information will present an ethical and economic challenge for veterinarians, and there will be skeptics. Some Organizations have reached a political compromise suggesting vaccines every three years to appease those who fear loss of income versus those who worry about possible side effects. Politics, traditions, or the financial well-being of the physician should not be a factor in medical decisions. “

In his clinical studies, Dr. W. Jean Dodds, DVM (938 Stanford Street, Santa Monica, CA 90403, (310) 828-4804; FAX (310) 828-8251) writes:

– “Puppies and kittens receive antibodies through breast milk. This natural protection can last from 8 to 14 weeks. Puppies and kittens should not be vaccinated before 8 weeks.”

My own breeder waited 12 weeks. Does this make you wonder if pet stores and puppy mills consider this important protocol?

Caution: the best part of the value
I am not writing this to put fear in the hearts of pet owners. Fear makes us make wrong decisions in a state of panic. But we shouldn’t trust someone simply because they have an MD or DVM next to their name. My personal experience is an example of what a rabies vaccine can do to a healthy dog ​​or cat when the vaccine is given too often. Note that there are those who advocate not giving it at all after initial puppy / kitten vaccinations.

Too close for your comfort
Two weeks ago, my healthy, energetic, playful, bright-eyed puppy almost died after moving from a state, where the three-year rabies requirement prevails, to another state where my vet told me annual rabies vaccinations are required. regardless of the vaccine used (there are different manufacturers).

-Within four hours of receiving his second annual injection plus six-month boosters of other “required” injections, my dog ​​was not eating or drinking water; she couldn’t walk. When we tried to get her to her feet, she stood up like a glass-eyed statue; he couldn’t relieve himself; she was paralyzed.

-My vet admitted that he had seen this reaction before in various breeds of dogs (dachshunds, golden retrievers) and cats; It does not depend on size, breed or species, but on how the animal tolerates the manufacturer’s vaccine. Then he arrogantly gave her a cortisone shot and said she should be fine in a couple of days. Shots, shots, shots! “Next time we will add some Benedryl beforehand,” he added.

-It took four days for Molly to recover from a zombie to a normal dog. Others have not been so lucky and have died days after receiving annual rabies vaccinations. If your state allows it, your veterinarian can write an annual vaccine waiver. We later discovered another vet in the same area who is giving three-year rabies shots. Ergo, it is not a state law where I reside.

In our society, children and animals have no rights. And just like young children, household pets depend on us for everything from healthcare to daily necessities. Dogs and cats have keen senses that we don’t. As a result, they have saved our lives and loved us unconditionally. In fact, in the case of the dog, migratory humans would never have passed the ice age and millennia without the adaptable dog. We owe it to canines and felines not to put them at risk, never consciously fail them, always question.

+ Read: Catherine O’Driscoll’s “System Shock” and “What Vets Don’t Tell You About Vaccines.”

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